4 minutes, 33 seconds contest


The 4 minutes, 33 seconds contest highlights UGA student research in the arts and provides an opportunity to win prizes and to share creative inquiry with peers, faculty, administrators, and alumni throughout the university community. 
 


 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is research in the arts?

Research in the arts is a process by which we identify an inquiry and strive towards the production of new knowledge. This may be research conducted towards the synthesis of a thesis or research paper, or a creative project that you have executed at UGA or in the community.

 

Do I need scholarly citations on my poster or in my presentation for my project to count as "research"?

Not necessarily. Your presentation/poster could reflect a project surrounding an inquiry or problem that you have striven to solve based on experimentation. Your presentation/poster could also reflect research you have completed for a degree thesis or other research paper. Show that you have asked a critical question, developed a methodology, and shared your resulting knowledge in some way.

 

Is my project/research eligible?

If you had a research question about the arts, or that you sought to answer through the arts, your project is eligible for the 4'33" Spotlight on Arts Scholarship Competition. State your research questions clearly, the steps you have taken to investigate them, and the ways in which your project is innovative. If your project demonstrates critical thought and problem solving, it is eligible!

 

Why submit a proposal?

The UGA community wants to hear about the topics students feel are meaningful and urgent. Engage with other people doing research in the arts and make your voice heard on topics important to you. Prize winners will also receive a monetary award.

 

I am an undergraduate student with a unique project or research topic. Can I submit my proposal even though I am not in CURO?

Absolutely! We want to hear about all students' innovative research and projects.

 

Why is it called the 4'33'' competition?

4'33" is an homage to John Cage's landmark composition 4'33".

 

For more about current definitions of research in the arts visit: https://www.a2ru.org/projects/research-brief-what-is-research/



Previous Winners


2020

Participants in the 2019 4 minutes, 33 seconds competition

Jason Woodworth-Hou, winner of the 2020 4"33" Research in the Arts Competition. 
His presentation  was entitled "Redefining Animation: How 
They Shall Not Grow Old 
Redefines Truthmaking Through CGI Animation."

Other competition finalist include:
Annie Simpson, MFA Studio Art
Atalanta Siegel, MFA Acting
Morgan Tate, PhD Social Studies Education
Nicollette Frank, PhD Elementary Education
Paula Reynaldi, MFA Studio Art
Robyn Acetta, MFA Acting
Sarah Shermyen, PhD English
SungEun Min, PhD, Educational Theory and Practice
Viviane Klen-Alves, PhD TESOL and World Language Education


 
2019

Participants in the 2019 4 minutes, 33 seconds competition

Pictured are the participants in the 2019 4 minutes, 33 seconds competition. The winner of the oral presentation was Kathleen McGovern (pictured below with guest judge Kishi Bashi). McGovern is a Language and Literature Education Ph.D. candidate in the College of Education.

Participants in the 2019 4 minutes, 33 seconds competition




2018
 

2018 winners of the 4 minutes, 33 seconds competition

Pictured with Graduate School Dean Suzanne Barbour (center) are (l-r) Samantha Lynn Hudson, an MFA student in dramatic media; Rhia Moreno, a doctoral student in language and literacy education; Kuo Zhang, a doctoral student in the language and literacy education program; and Bridget Dooley, a doctoral student in creative writing. Last November, Kuo won the 4'33" competition in the presentation category, and the other three received awards in the poster competition.



2017

Ally Christmas presents her research in the 4 minutes, 33 seconds competition

Pictured is the award winner in the presentation category Ally Christmas, a master of fine arts student in the Lamar Dodd School of Art. Poster exhibition winners include: Madison A. Hogan, Undergraduate Major, Department of English; Abigail Kosberg, MA Art History, Lamar Dodd School of Art; and Marlon Burnley, MFA Acting, Department of Theatre and Film Studies. 



2017

Participants in the 2016 4 minutes, 33 seconds competition

Pictured are the participants in the 2016 4 minutes, 33 seconds competition. The winner of the oral presentation was Meg Hankel, and recipients of the first annual poster competition included Arron Foster, Damon Postle and Kaleena Stasiak. 



2015

2015 winners of the 4 minutes, 33 seconds competitionThe 2015 winners of the presentation competition are pictured with Georgia Museum of Art Director William Eiland, who served as emcee. Theresa Chafin (left) is a grad student in the Hugh Hodgson School of Music and Beth Fadeley (right) is an art history student in the Lamar Dodd School of Art. 



2014

2014 winners of the 4 minutes, 33 seconds competition

Graduate students K. Scott Eggert (left) of the Hugh Hodgson School of Music and Karen Sweeney Gerow (right) of the Lamar Dodd School of Art are the winners of the inaugural 4 minutes, 33 seconds: Spotlight on Scholarship competition. They are pictured with then-Vice Provost Russ Mumper, the emcee of the event.