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Spotlight on the Arts 2015 Schedule - Nov. 5-14

The fourth annual Spotlight on the Arts festival is scheduled for Nov. 5-14, 2015. More than 60 events celebrating the visual, literary and performing arts at UGA are on the schedule.

Wednesday, Nov. 4 Kickoff

Opening Celebration
7:30 p.m., Performing Arts Center
The opening celebration for the 2015 Spotlight on the Arts festival will feature a sampler of student music, dance and dramatic performances, as well as opening remarks from University System of Georgia Chancellor Hank Huckaby and President Jere W. Morehead. A reception will be held at the Lamar Dodd School of Art following the celebration, and the event is free and open to the public. Sponsored by the UGA Arts Council
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Opening Celebration After-Party
8:30 p.m., Lamar Dodd School of Art
Come celebrate the opening of the fourth-annual Spotlight on the Arts festival, with entertainment from Athens-based cellist Alec Livaditis followed by New York experimental duo, Zs. The band has been labeled everything from no-wave to brutal-prog to post-minimalist. Their main concern is making music that challenges the physical and mental limitations of both performer and listener. Manipulating extended technique, unique instrumental synthesis, and near telepathic communication, Zs creates works that envelop the listener and unfold sonically over time. An Art Talk with Sam Hillmer from Z's will be held in Room S150 at 2 p.m.
Sponsored by the Lamar Dodd School of Art and Slingshot Athens

Thursday, Nov. 5

UGA Press Dirty Book Sale
9 a.m. – 4 p.m., Tate Student Center
The book sale features slightly damaged or shopworn books in a range of subjects including nature writing, poetry, fiction, literary criticism, and history will be available, as well as general interest titles about Georgia and the South. Open to individuals with a valid UGA ID.

Student Spotlight Main Event
10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Tate Plaza
Students will perform throughout the day at Tate Plaza.
Sponsored by the UGA Arts Council
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4 minutes, 33 seconds competition
4:33 p.m., Balcony Theatre, Fine Arts Building
Graduate students will compete for two $433 prizes in this second annual competition, which highlights the research at the University of Georgia. Be sure to vote for the audience-favorite winner.
Sponsored by the UGA Arts Council

Fall Exhibitions Reception
5:30 - 7:30 p.m., Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries
The Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries will host its  biannual reception celebrating new exhibitions on display. The event will include light refreshments, guided tours, and gallery activities. The reception is free and open to the public. Reservations are not needed, but please register at: lnessel@uga.edu or call 706.542.3879. For more information about the Special Collections Libraries call 706.542.7123 or visit www.libs.uga.edu/scl

Thursday Twilight Tour: Highlights from the Permanent Collection
6 p.m., Georgia Museum of Art
Led by docents.

A Reading by Poet Jeffrey Harrison
7 p.m., Ciné
234 W. Hancock Ave., Athens
Harrison studied poetry with New York School figureheads Kenneth Koch and David Shapiro. He is the author of five full-length books of poetry—"Into Daylight," published in 2014 by Tupelo Press as the winner of the Dorset Prize, "Incomplete Knowledge" (2006), which was runner-up for the Poets’ Prize, "Feeding the Fire" (2001), "Signs of Arrival" (1996), and "The Singing Underneath" (1988), selected by James Merrill for the National Poetry Series—as well as of "The Names of Things: New and Selected Poems," published in 2006 by Waywiser Press in the U.K. A recipient of Guggenheim and NEA Fellowships, as well as other honors, he has published poems in the New Republic, the New Yorker, the Nation, Poetry, the Yale Review, the Hudson Review, American Poetry Review, the Paris Review, Poets of the New Century, The Twentieth Century in Poetry, and in many other magazines and anthologies.
The Georgia Poetry Circuit event is free and open to the public; books will be made available for purchase courtesy of Avid Bookshop.

Opera performance of Lehár: The Merry Widow
8 p.m., Hodgson Concert Hall, UGA Performing Arts Center
The Merry Widow (German: Die lustige Witwe) is an operetta by the Austro-Hungarian composer Franz Lehár. The librettists, Viktor Léon and Leo Stein, based the story – concerning a rich widow, and her countrymen's attempt to keep her money in the principality by finding her the right husband – on an 1861 comedy play, L'attaché d'ambassade (The Embassy Attaché) by Henri Meilhac.  The operetta has enjoyed extraordinary international success since its 1905 premiere in Vienna. [from Wikipedia]

Friday, Nov. 6

UGA Press Dirty Book Sale
9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Tate Student Center
The book sale features slightly damaged or shopworn books in a range of subjects including nature writing, poetry, fiction, literary criticism, and history will be available, as well as general interest titles about Georgia and the South. Open to the public.

Football Friday Tour
3:30 p.m., Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries
A guided tour of "Unbeaten, Untied, Undisputed: Georgia's 1980 National Championship," an exhibit of materials from the UGA Athletic Association Archives. Meet in the Rotunda of the Russell Special Collections Libraries.
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Film Screening: Heremakono/Waiting for Happiness
7 p.m., SCADshow Stage 2, 173 14th St., Atlanta, GA
The internationally acclaimed filmmaker Abderrahmane Sissako will visit Atlanta for two days of events including film screenings, student workshops, and an audience forum as part of France-Atlanta, a two-week series of events designed to foster cooperation between France and the U.S. Southeast in the scientific,business, cultural, and humanitarian domains. It is presented under the high auspices of the Ambassador of France to the United States, the Governor of Georgia, and the Mayor of Atlanta, with the support of all of the French and French-American associations in Atlanta.

Opera performance of Lehár: The Merry Widow
8 p.m., Hodgson Concert Hall, UGA Performing Arts Center

University Theatre performance: “You Can’t Take It With You” by George S. Kaufman & Moss Hart
Nov. 6, 11-14 at 8 p.m.
Nov. 8 & 15 at 2:30 p.m.
Special matinee for area schools Nov. 10 at 10 a.m.
Fine Arts Theatre, Fine Arts Building
This Pulitzer Prize-winning play, described by the New York Times as “one of the most persuasive works of pure escapism in Broadway history,” features a delightfully eccentric, free-spirited family. The play, an unprecedented success when it initially opened in 1936, enjoyed a hit Broadway revival in 2014.
An offering of UGA’s Spotlight on the Arts Festival.

Saturday, Nov. 7

Willson Center / Waffle House Spotlight on the Arts Tailgate
Time TBD, Willson Center
Tailgate at the Willson Center before the football game vs. Kentucky (time TBA) with catering courtesy of Waffle House. Music by Winfield Smith of Stewart and Winfield (English, Class of ’93), Ansley Stewart of the Terry College Music Business Program (M.A., Journalism, UGA ’15), and Scotty Nicholson (Music Composition, UGA ’97).

Fall Festival
10 a.m. – 12 p.m., Theater-in-the-Woods, State Botanical Garden of Georgia 
Playing in the leaves?  Storytelling?  Making apple cider?  Creating art out of nature?  What else would you think of to celebrate fall?  Join us for the beginnings of many seasonal festivals to come as we celebrate the Theatre in the Woods and the space that will become known to be the Forest Play area of the Children’s Garden. Free but donations for the Children’s Garden accepted

Film Screening: Timbuktu
4 p.m., Woodruff Arts Center, Hill Auditorium, 1280 Peachtree St NE, Atlanta 
The internationally acclaimed filmmaker Abderrahmane Sissako will visit Atlanta for two days of events including film screenings, student workshops, and an audience forum as part of France-Atlanta, a two-week series of events designed to foster cooperation between France and the U.S. Southeast in the scientific,business, cultural, and humanitarian domains. It is presented under the high auspices of the Ambassador of France to the United States, the Governor of Georgia, and the Mayor of Atlanta, with the support of all of the French and French-American associations in Atlanta.

Sunday, Nov. 8

UGA Press Gospel Brunch: A Benefit for the Bill Anderson Music History Book Series
9:30 a.m., 10:15 a.m., and 11 a.m. seatings available, Rialto Room at Hotel Indigo 500 College Ave
Singing a mixture of original music and cover songs—with harmonies steeped in blues, soul, and gospel—Kyshona Armstrong, Betsy Franck, and Ansley Stewart perform at a benefit for the Bill Anderson Music History Book Series from the University of Georgia Press. Brunch will be provided by acclaimed local chef Peter Dale of the National, featuring delicious Springer Mountain Farms chicken. Books published in the series will explore a diverse range of scholarship and genre, including ethnomusicology, music history, music business, memoir/autobiography, and others. Cost is $30 per person. Reservations required by Nov. 5 and can be made at http://t.uga.edu/1Qg or by contacting Leandra Nessel at 706-542-3879.

Georgia Writers Hall of Fame Author events

Sustainability: Preserving our Environmental Heritage
Lightning talks featuring Janisse Ray and UGA Students

1 p.m., Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries Auditorium
In coordination with UGA’s Office of Sustainability, the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame presents a series of lightning talks presented by selected UGA students and 2015 inductee Janisse Ray about the issue of sustainability. Ray is an award-winning environmental writer and activist whose current passion is the issue of sustainability. The 5-6 minute student presentations will focus on their research in relation to Watershed UGA, a town and gown initiative to involve the UGA Campus and the Athens community in restoring our streams. Watershed UGA is transforming our local streams into a living laboratory.

Our Civil Rights Past: A Conversation with Taylor Branch and UGA Students about the Civil Rights Movement, with footage from the Civil Rights Digital Library
2 p.m., Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries Auditorium
A panel of UGA students has selected a series of short film clips from the Civil Rights Digital Library that align with events detailed in "The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement," written by 2015 inductee Taylor Branch. Each student has prepared a question for Mr. Branch about these events and how they relate to contemporary issues and events. The panel of students was selected by Dr. Barbara McCaskill, a member of the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame Board of Judges.

Author Discussion Series
Featuring Taylor Branch and Janisse Ray

4 p.m., Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries Auditorium
A moderated panel discussion will feature Taylor Branch and Janisse Ray, two of the 2015 inductees into the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame.  Moderated by Dr. Hugh Ruppersburg, Branch and Ray will discuss what it means to be a Georgia writer and will share details of their writing life. Reception to follow.

Spotlight Tour: Highlights from the Permanent Collection
3 p.m., Georgia Museum of Art
Led by docents.

University Theatre performance: “You Can’t Take It With You” by George S. Kaufman & Moss Hart
Nov. 6, 11-14 at 8 p.m.
Nov. 8 & 15 at 2:30 p.m.
Special matinee for area schools Nov. 10 at 10 a.m.
Fine Arts Theatre, Fine Arts Building
This Pulitzer Prize-winning play, described by the New York Times as “one of the most persuasive works of pure escapism in Broadway history,” features a delightfully eccentric, free-spirited family. The play, an unprecedented success when it initially opened in 1936, enjoyed a hit Broadway revival in 2014.
An offering of UGA’s Spotlight on the Arts Festival.

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Robert Spano, Conductor
Thomas Sherwood and Charles Settle, Percussionists

3 p.m., Hodgson Concert Hall, Performing Arts Center
The exciting program features Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5 and Avner Dorman’s concerto for orchestra and percussionists, Spices, Perfumes, and Toxins! Known for his intricate craftsmanship and rigorous technique, Dorman is one of this generation’s most successful young composers. The concerto combines Middle-Eastern drums, orchestral percussion, and rock drums with orchestral forces.

Monday, Nov. 9

Georgia Writers Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony
10:30 a.m., Auditorium, Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries
300 S. Hull Street, Athens, GA 30602
Vereen Bell, Taylor Branch, Paul Hemphill and Janisse Ray are the 2015 inductees.
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Stories of Oconee Hill Cemetery
11:30 a.m., Oconee Hill Cemetery
Oconee Hill Cemetery was created in 1856 from 17 acres owned by the city of Athens along the Oconee River. It expanded in 1889 and is now the largest green space within the boundaries of the old city of Athens. Oconee Hill Cemetery is nationally recognized as one of the most outstanding examples of the art of Victorian cemetery design and funerary representation in the nation. Come visit Oconee Hill Cemetery for a short tour of its historical monuments and hear the stories associated with the people who rest there. This is an opportunity for students and faculty to learn about opportunities for experiential learning and research connected to the Oconee Hill Cemetery. It is open to the public. Please prepare for inclement weather and to walk over broken ground. A partnership between the Friends of Oconee Hill Cemetery, the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, the Willson Center Digital Humanities Lab, University of Georgia Experiential Learning, the Office of Service Learning, the College of Environment and Design and the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.

Film Screening: Vertigo
7:30 p.m., Cine
The Willson Center presents a special screening of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1958 masterpiece Vertigo with an introduction by Philip McGowan of Queens University Belfast. The film, starring James Stewart and Kim Novak, was voted #1 on the British magazine Sight and Sound‘s 2012 decennial list of the greatest films of all time. Free for UGA students with ID, $5 for all others

The King’s Singers
8 p.m., Performing Arts Center, Hodgson Concert Hall
The Times of London calls them “The superlative vocal sextet.” Spend an evening with the two-time Grammy winners as they perform some of their favorite songs from around the world in a delightful program entitled "Postcards." The concert will also feature selections from the Great American Songbook including classics by Cole Porter, George Gershwin and Richard Rodgers.

Tuesday, Nov. 10

UGA Golden Age Band

12 p.m., Performing Arts Center Quad
A free concert of band music from the era of John Philip Sousa.

Book talk with Valerie Frey, author of Preserving Family Recipes
3 p.m., Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries Auditorium
Writer and archivist Valerie Frey will discuss her new book, Preserving Family Recipes: How to Save and Celebrate Your Food Traditions, a guide for gathering, adjusting, supplementing, and safely preserving family recipes and for interviewing relatives, collecting oral histories, and conducting kitchen visits to document family food traditions from the everyday to special occasions.

Tuesday Tour
2 p.m., Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries
The Tour at Two will include a Spotlight Special tour of the vault, normally closed to the public, in addition to the exhibits in our three museum galleries.

Ensemble Concert: Jazz Band I and II
6:00 p.m., Ramsey Hall, UGA Performing Arts Center

Johnstone Lecture: The Garden at Night: Moths, Pollination Services, and Climate Change
7 p.m., reception following, State Botanical Garden of Georgia Visitor Center & Conservatory
James W. Porter is the Josiah Meigs Professor of Ecology at the University of Georgia, a renaissance man who is known for his award winning photography, as well as his knowledge of butterflies and moths, climate change, coral reefs, and ecology. Join us for a talk that will be a delight for both your eyes and your curious mind. Meet Dr. Porter during the reception following his talk. Dr. Porter has received the UGA Creative Research Award, the University's Meigs Teaching Award, and the prestigious Eugene P. Odum Award for environmental education. He is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Naturalists, and the Great Barrier Reef Committee.  In 2006, he was elected President of Sigma Xi, a scientific honor society with more than 160,000 members worldwide, including all living Nobel Laureates.
Dr. Porter's award winning photographs have appeared in Life Magazine and the New York Times.  His work has been featured on ABC World News, NBC Nightly News, CNN News, and the CBS Evening News.
Although Dr. Porter is now a marine ecologist, his undergraduate work was in the area of entomology.  He returned to the study of butterflies and moths while teaching ecology at UGA’s field station in Costa Rica.  He continued these studies upon his return to Athens, and is currently writing a book about the butterflies of Costa Rica.
Free but reservations requested 706-542-9353 or garden@uga.edu. The Johnstone Lecture, sponsored by FRIENDS of the State Botanical Garden of Georgia, was named in honor of the State Botanical Garden’s first director, Dr. Francis E. Johnstone, Jr.

Screening: Salt of the Earth
7:30 p.m., Cine
The Salt of the Earth, directed by Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, is a 2014 French-Brazilian biographical documentary film that portrays the works of the Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado. It won the Special Prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary at the 87th Academy Awards. It won the 2014 Audience Award at the San Sebastián International Film Festival, the 2015 Audience Award at the Tromsø International Film Festival, and the César Award for Best Documentary Film at the 40th César Awards. Free for UGA students with ID; $5 for all others

Wednesday, Nov. 11

Tour at Two: “Georgia’s Girlhood Embroidery: ‘Crowned with Glory and Immortality’”
2 p.m., Georgia Museum of Art
Join Kathleen Staples, independent scholar and co-curator of the exhibition, for a gallery talk.

Screening: Raise the Roof
6 p.m. & 8:30 p.m., Ciné
Raise the Roof is a 2014 documentary film that follows artists Rick and Laura Brown to Sanok, Poland, as they begin rebuilding Gwoździec, a magnificent wooden eighteenth century synagogue in Poland that was later destroyed by the Nazis. Their vision inspires hundreds of people to join them, using their hands, old tools and techniques to bring Gwoździec’s history, culture, science, and art back to life. Free for UGA students with ID; $5 for all others

University Theatre performance: “You Can’t Take It With You” by George S. Kaufman & Moss Hart
Nov. 6, 11-14 at 8 p.m.
Nov. 8 & 15 at 2:30 p.m.
Special matinee for area schools Nov. 10 at 10 a.m.
Fine Arts Theatre, Fine Arts Building
This Pulitzer Prize-winning play, described by the New York Times as “one of the most persuasive works of pure escapism in Broadway history,” features a delightfully eccentric, free-spirited family. The play, an unprecedented success when it initially opened in 1936, enjoyed a hit Broadway revival in 2014.
An offering of UGA’s Spotlight on the Arts Festival.

Thursday, Nov. 12

Book Symposium: "Appropriation in the Age of Global Shakespeare"
Nov. 12-14, Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries
"Appropriation in the Age of Global Shakespeare," brings to the UGA campus four of the leading scholars of Shakespeare around the world to discuss how TV shows, films, novels, poems, operas, music and stage plays from different countries and cultures adapt Shakespeare and make these 400-year-old plays and poems their own.
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Plenary Address by Alexa Huang: “Others Within: Ethics in the Age of Global Shakespeare.”
4 p.m., Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries Auditorium

Lamar Dodd School of Art Open House
5 p.m. - 8 p.m., Lamar Dodd School of Art locations
Come explore the work of students and artists at the various Dodd facilities, including demonstrations and talks on fabric design, printmaking and book arts, drawing and painting, graphic design, ceramics, interior design, photography, jewelry, metals and sculpture and art education. For the full schedule of events, click HERE.

Samurai lecture
Lecture: William Fleming
“American Samurai: A Teenager’s Journey from New England to the Satsuma Rebellion”

5:30 p.m., Georgia Museum of Art
William Fleming, assistant professor of East Asian languages and literatures and theater studies, Yale University, will speak in conjunction with the exhibition “Samurai: The Way of the Warrior.” The Satsuma Rebellion (1877) and the rebels who died in it have been romanticized in the Japanese imagination almost from the moment they first took up arms. On this side of the Pacific, the conflict was recently freely reimagined on the big screen in “The Last Samurai,” with Tom Cruise portraying a fictional American veteran who throws in his lot with the cause. But fighting alongside rebel leader Saigō Takamori was a real-life commander, fresh from America whose forgotten story is every bit as remarkable as the one dreamed up by Hollywood. Relying on previously unexplored archival materials from collections in the United States and Japan, this talk brings to life the untold tale of a teenage warrior whose bravery and determination in battle earned him the nickname “Little Saigō.” Co-sponsored by UGA Army ROTC.

Student Night
6:30 p.m., Georgia Museum of Art
Join the Student Association of the Georgia Museum of Art for a night of music, food, fun and themed activities to celebrate the latest exhibitions. Student Night is generously sponsored by UGA Parents and Families Association.

Kendo Demonstration
7 – 7:30 p.m., Georgia Museum of Art
In celebration of “Samurai: The Way of the Warrior,” student organization Kendo at UGA will provide a demonstration of this modern Japanese martial art. The mission at Kendo at UGA is to cultivate the understanding, promote the tradition and exercise our minds and bodies in the Way of the Sword.

Samurai Film Series: “The Hidden Fortress”
7 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Introduction by Masaki Mori, associate professor and assistant director of the Japanese Program at UGA. A grand-scale adventure, “The Hidden Fortress” stars Toshiro Mifune as a general charged with guarding his defeated clan’s princess (a fierce Misa Uehara) as the two smuggle royal treasure across hostile territory. This rip-roaring ride is among the director’s most beloved films and was a primary influence on George Lucas’ “Star Wars.” Directed by Akira Kurosawa. Japanese with English subtitles. 1958, 126 min. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition “Samurai: The Way of the Warrior.” This film series is generously sponsored by UGA Parents and Families Association.

Hodgson Wind Ensemble
7:30 p.m., Hodgson Hall, UGA Performing Arts Center
An epic evening of music with the Hodgson Wind Ensemble and director Cynthia Johnston Turner
features Audivi Media Nocte by Oliver Waespi and David Maslanka’s imposing Symphony No. 8.

Young Choreographers Series: Senior Exit and Emerging Choreographers Concert
8 p.m., New Dance Theatre, Dance Building
Choreography and production by graduating senior dance major and B.F.A. candidate Alexis Birts combined with the Emerging Choreographers showcasing choreography by second and third year dance majors, performed by dancers selected by audition.  A reception will follow the Friday evening performance.

University Theatre performance: “You Can’t Take It With You” by George S. Kaufman & Moss Hart
Nov. 6, 11-14 at 8 p.m.
Nov. 8 & 15 at 2:30 p.m.
Special matinee for area schools Nov. 10 at 10 a.m.
Fine Arts Theatre, Fine Arts Building
This Pulitzer Prize-winning play, described by the New York Times as “one of the most persuasive works of pure escapism in Broadway history,” features a delightfully eccentric, free-spirited family. The play, an unprecedented success when it initially opened in 1936, enjoyed a hit Broadway revival in 2014.
An offering of UGA’s Spotlight on the Arts Festival.

Friday, Nov. 13

Book Symposium: "Appropriation in the Age of Global Shakespeare"
Nov. 12-14, Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries
"Appropriation in the Age of Global Shakespeare," brings to the UGA campus four of the leading scholars of Shakespeare around the world to discuss how TV shows, films, novels, poems, operas, music and stage plays from different countries and cultures adapt Shakespeare and make these 400-year-old plays and poems their own.
MORE

Morning Mindfulness in the Museum
9:30 a.m., Georgia Museum of Art
Join instructor Jerry Gale in the museum's galleries for a free meditation session to enhance mindful practice in an environment of creative energy. Gale will lead participants in meditation followed by a period of reflection and discussion. Meet in the lobby. Stools without backs are provided; please bring a cushion if desired. Reservations are encouraged. Call 706.542.0448 or email branew@uga.edu.

Department of Dance Performance Sampler
12:15-12:45 p.m., New Dance Theatre, Dance Building
UGA dance students will perform a variety of dance styles in classical and contemporary ballet, contemporary modern, and aerial dance with mixed media featuring faculty created choreographic works by UGA Ballet Ensemble, CORE Concert Contemporary and Aerial Dance Company and Spring Dance Concert.  This will showcase a sample of works to be presented in the Spring 2016 Department of Dance concert productions.

Staged Reading: Lolita Chakrabarti's “Red Velvet”
5:30 p.m., Fine Arts Building Balcony Theatre

Bachelor of Fine Arts Students' Exhibition Opening
6 p.m. - 8 p.m.
A reception honoring the work of Lamar Dodd School of Art students earning their Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees.

A Reading by Fiction Writer George Singleton
6:30 p.m., Hendershot’s
237 Prince Ave., Athens
Singleton has written six collections of short stories, two novels, and a book on the art of writing fiction. In 2009, Singleton was a Guggenheim Fellow, and in 2011 he was awarded the Hillsdale Award for Fiction by The Fellowship of Southern Writers. In 2013, Singleton accepted the John C. Cobb Endowed Chair in the Humanities at Wofford College where he currently teaches.
The event will be free and open to the public; books will be made available for purchase courtesy of Avid Bookshop. After the reading, local musical act The Michael Lesousky Trio (featuring also Matt Haeck and Caleb Darnell) will perform.

Young Choreographers Series: Senior Exit and Emerging Choreographers Concert
8 p.m., New Dance Theatre, Dance Building
Choreography and production by graduating senior dance major and B.F.A. candidate Alexis Birts combined with the Emerging Choreographers showcasing choreography by second and third year dance majors, performed by dancers selected by audition.  A reception will follow the Friday evening performance.

University Theatre performance: “You Can’t Take It With You” by George S. Kaufman & Moss Hart
Nov. 6, 11-14 at 8 p.m.
Nov. 8 & 15 at 2:30 p.m.
Special matinee for area schools Nov. 10 at 10 a.m.
Fine Arts Theatre, Fine Arts Building
This Pulitzer Prize-winning play, described by the New York Times as “one of the most persuasive works of pure escapism in Broadway history,” features a delightfully eccentric, free-spirited family. The play, an unprecedented success when it initially opened in 1936, enjoyed a hit Broadway revival in 2014.
An offering of UGA’s Spotlight on the Arts Festival.

Saturday, Nov. 14

Book Symposium: "Appropriation in the Age of Global Shakespeare"
Nov. 12-14, Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries
"Appropriation in the Age of Global Shakespeare," brings to the UGA campus four of the leading scholars of Shakespeare around the world to discuss how TV shows, films, novels, poems, operas, music and stage plays from different countries and cultures adapt Shakespeare and make these 400-year-old plays and poems their own.
MORE

Family Day: Samurai: The Way of the Warrior
10 a.m.- 12 p.m., Georgia Museum of Art
View beautiful samurai suits of armor, helmets, swords, saddles and more in the exhibition “Samurai: The Way of the Warrior,” then create your very own kabuto helmet in the Michael and Mary Erlanger Studio Classroom. Family Day programs are sponsored by Heyward Allen Motor Co., Inc., Heyward Allen Toyota and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art.

Instrument Petting Zoo
10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Hugh Hodgson School of Music
The Instrument Petting Zoo is an opportunity for families to learn about a wide variety of musical instruments—how they are made, their musical history and even what they sound like, by trying out the instruments for themselves and through demonstrations from Hugh Hodgson School of Music students. Follow signs around the Performing Arts Center and School of Music to visit the Orchestra Room to see, hear and play for yourself.

New Town Revue: Shakespeare Remix
6:30 p.m., Fire Hall No. 2
489 Prince Avenue, Athens
Performers will be riffing on the bard in their own unique way. The lineup: Cindy Watkins: poetry; Laura Leidner: prose; music composed by Richard Hunsinger and performed by the UGA New Music Ensemble.

Young Choreographers Series: Senior Exit and Emerging Choreographers Concert
8 p.m., New Dance Theatre, Dance Building
Choreography and production by graduating senior dance major and B.F.A. candidate Alexis Birts combined with the Emerging Choreographers showcasing choreography by second and third year dance majors, performed by dancers selected by audition.  A reception will follow the Friday evening performance.

University Theatre performance: “You Can’t Take It With You” by George S. Kaufman & Moss Hart
Nov. 6, 11-14 at 8pm
Nov. 8 & 15 at 2:30pm
Special matinee for area schools Nov. 10 at 10am
Fine Arts Theatre, Fine Arts Building
This Pulitzer Prize-winning play, described by the New York Times as “one of the most persuasive works of pure escapism in Broadway history,” features a delightfully eccentric, free-spirited family. The play, an unprecedented success when it initially opened in 1936, enjoyed a hit Broadway revival in 2014.
An offering of UGA’s Spotlight on the Arts Festival.

Exhibitions

Lamar Dodd School of Art

Gallery 307: The Figure 8
Slippage, flux, and change are the tenets of The Figure 8, an exhibition that features three female artists who explore, through a variety of media, the multitude of ways that these principles might be expressed. Most markedly, Elizabeth Jaeger, Amy Pleasant, and J.Parker Valentine engage simultaneously the figurative associations of the body and abstraction articulated by line and color. The works’ capacity to shift back and forth from the abstract to the physical creates a deeper meditation on the body, on subjectivity, and on how we construct narratives. Like the nominal figure 8, an agreed upon numeral abstraction that also looks similar to a schematic rendering of a person, the works in the exhibition, present us with a series of symbols and associations, representations of both ways.

Gallery 101: Farrah Karapetain: Step Twice:
Step Twice is an exhibition of one sculptural "negative" and a set of photograms made during the artist's month-long residency at the Dodd Galleries. The work circles around Karapetian’s current preoccupation with water and migration, and employs the range of her unique photographic practice. These pictures come from questions: What is it in the human experience that drives us from  place to place? What do we hope to find in the act of leaving? Might movement ever finally alleviate the pressure of being human, or is it just a performance we need to repeat in order to survive?

Plaza Gallery: Forms of Adornment: Flesh and the Erotic
The nine artists in Forms of Adornment, working primarily in jewelry and metals, investigate the body by provoking feelings of desire, humor, and urgency. The works selected for the exhibition explore intimacy in relation to gender and identity as well as the human experience in contemporary culture. The exhibition is curated by Jewelry and Metals MFA candidate, Vivienne Varay, and features the work of Leslie D. Boyd, Sarah Holden, Heidi Jensen, Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro, Jina Seo, Olivia Shih, Lily Smith, Vivienne Varay, and Mallory Weston.

Suite Gallery: Alex Hodge: Unsung Muses
Unsung Muses is an exhibition featuring a new series of clay works by undergraduate student in ceramics, Alex Hodge. Her work simultaneously references ancient Greek vessels, art historical tropes, as well as contemporary feminist critique. The hand built pots tell the stories of heroic women, angry women, and beautiful goddesses arriving to Earth. Hodge explains, “By putting unconventional beauty at the center of the narrative, feminist concerns are woven into an unprecedented display of splendor."

Bridge Gallery: In Process: Eileen Wallace
In Process is a sporadic series at the Galleries that exhibits inquiries, research, and “in-process” projects by Dodd faculty. Our first show in the series features the work of printmaking and book arts professor, Eileen Wallace. Using linoleum tiles taken from a defunct and derelict amusement park, Fun Mountain, Wallace explores the found object in relief printing and through research on the history of the site in Gatlinburg, TN.

Georgia Museum of Art

Samurai: The Way of the Warrior
Drawing from the rich and varied Japanese collection of the Stibbert Museum, in Florence, Italy, and organized by Contemporanea Progetti in collaboration with the Stibbert, this evocative exhibition features some 100 objects related to the legendary samurai warriors—full suits of armor, helmets, swords, sword-hilts and saddles but also objects intended for more personal use such as lacquered writing boxes, incense trays and foldable chairs that characterize the period in which Japan was ruled by the samurai military class. One horizontal scroll that depicts a procession measures nearly 60 feet long. Curator Francesco Civita, who oversees the collection at the Stibbert, writes, “The Japanese sword can be considered a key to the study of the history, traditions, and customs of Japan. . . . Because of its various parts and fittings called kodogu in Japanese, which immortalize heroic figures, gods, mythological events, heraldic symbols, animals and objects of daily use, the sword is also an anthropological tool, providing information of considerable importance.” The exhibition includes about 20 swords as well as 20 separate sword guards, equally elaborately decorated. Helmets feature adornments made to resemble Shinto spirits and demons, and full suits of armor are colorful and complex, with lacquer-accented metal plates and silk ribbons. Frederick Stibbert (1838–1906) was one of the first European collectors of Japanese art, and donated his collection of Japanese armor and arms to the city of Florence. His villa was turned into a museum. Samurai translates as “those who serve,” and their job was to protect wealthy landowners. Their code was known as bushido, or the way of the warrior, and focused on discipline, honor and loyalty.  The samurai were highly involved in the Japanese government and rose to power in the 12th century as a military dictatorship known as the Shogunate. They would rule until Japan was opened to the outside world in the late 1850s. Sponsored by Japan Foundation New York; TD Automotive Compressor Georgia, LLC; Marilyn McNeely, The McNeely Foundation; Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Phares; the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art.
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In Time We Shall Know Ourselves: Photographs by Raymond Smith
In the summer of 1974, a young man drove an aging Volkswagen from New England through the South and into the Midwest, camping and photographing people and places along the way to California. The car died in Kansas City and Raymond Smith took the train home to New Haven, Connecticut, where he printed some of the 750 exposures he had made with his Rolleiflex and Minolta twin-lens cameras. Few of these rare prints have been exhibited or published until now. These 52 images reflect the subjects, places and people Smith encountered. The exhibition is organized by the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama. Sponsored by the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art.
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Twists and Turns: Sculptures by Alice Aycock
Alice Aycock designed these two works—“Waltzing Matilda” and “Twin Vortexes”—as part of her series Park Avenue Paper Chase, originally installed on the Manhattan boulevard of the same name. Born in Pennsylvania, she trained as a sculptor with Robert Morris at Hunter College, New York, and has often focused on creating public art installations, from her early land art to these complex objects made of fiberglass and aluminum. For Park Avenue Paper Chase, she says she "tried to visualize the movement of wind energy as it flowed up and down the Avenue creating random whirlpools . . . touching down here and there and sometimes forming dynamic three-dimensional massing of forms.” She has work in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the National Gallery, as well as on view in cities across the United States. Sponsored by the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art.

Before the March King: 19th-Century American Bands
Before the popularization of recorded music, concert bands toured the United States, playing to at times enormous crowds and attracting the kind of attention nowadays reserved for top-40 pop stars. George Foreman, director of the University of Georgia’s Performing Arts Center, has collected materials related to these bands for years. This exhibition draws from his collection to present items that trace the development and history of the American band from its inception in the 1830s to the turn of the 20th century, including paintings, prints, illustrated sheet music, vintage instruments, photographs and more. Sponsored by Beth Hoover Baile, Drs. Robert and Ann Bretscher, Dr. and Mrs. Daniel H. Magill III, Lacy Middlebrooks and Thomas Camp, Mr. and Mrs. H. Daniels Minor, Van and Libby Morris, Clifton W. and Sylvia Hillyard Pannell, Gordhan and Jinx Patel, Bill and Pamela Prokasy, the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art.
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Georgia’s Girlhood Embroidery: “Crowned with Glory and Immortality”
This exhibition will feature ornamental needlework of Georgia and investigate both feminine skills and girlhood education in the state. It coincides with the 8th Henry D. Green Symposium of the Decorative Arts in February 2016 and will be accompanied by an exhibition catalogue published by the museum. Sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art.
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George Segal: Everyday Apparitions
George Segal was one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. He was affiliated with the Pop Art movement of the 1960s, along with Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Jasper Johns. Like these artists, Segal’s work addresses the conditions of modern daily life. He is best known for his life-size plaster sculptures of human figures arrayed in tableaus. These figures, sometimes ghostly white, sometimes brightly painted, exude a melancholy and isolation that Segal explored as inherent to the human condition in the 20th century; his work has often been labeled as a sculpted version of Edward Hopper’s paintings. The works in this exhibition, including one of the iconic life-size plaster sculptures, “Young Woman in Doorway,” are recent gifts to the permanent collection from the George and Helen Segal Foundation.

Special Collections Libraries

Hargrett:
Hello Freddy! A Tribute to Tony Award Winning Designer, Freddy Wittop
"Set Off for Georgia..." Celebrating the 250th Anniversary of John and William Bartram's Natural History Expedition in Colonial Georgia
"Appropriation in the Age of Global Shakespeare"
Georgia Writers Hall of Fame, featuring the 2015 inductees:  Vereen Bell, Taylor Branch, Paul Hemphill and Janisse Ray

Russell:
“Seeing Georgia: Changing Visions of Tourism and the Modern South” 

Media:
Pennington Radio Collection
Steele Vintage Broadcast Microphone Collection

State Botanical Garden of Georgia

Travels on the Bartram Trail: Beth Thompson’s Possible Perceptions
Visitor Center and Conservatory
This showing is the grand finale of a nearly four-year project during which Beth Thompson followed in the footsteps of the naturalist William Bartram along trails in Georgia, Florida, Alabama, and the Carolinas. With Bartram as a guide, Thompson photographed many of the plants, animals, and places described in Bartram’s influential Travels. Her results were first made available in 52 blog posts, “Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail” (www.beththompsonphotography.com), which began on January 1, 2012, and are scheduled for completion in October 2015. Each blog begins with an audio reading from Bartram’s Travels and includes Beth Thompson’s photographs and accounts of her Bartram Trail experiences, along with a “Possible Perception” – an image from one of her photographs that has been transformed so that it becomes kaleidoscopic in nature.
Beth Thompson graduated from the Lamar Dodd School of Art at the University of Georgia in 2002. She holds a B.F.A. degree in both photography and digital media. Following graduation, she spent 2 years in New York City, where she gravitated towards the natural world, teaching at the Bronx River Art Center and volunteering with the community gardens of the city. On returning home to Athens, Beth has been continually working on her art and in her field.