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The Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia has received the College Art Association's Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections and Exhibitions for its exhibition catalog

Georgia Museum of Art wins College Art Association’s Barr Award

The Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia has received the College Art Association's Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections and Exhibitions for its exhibition catalog "Cercle et Carré and the International Spirit of Abstract Art." The association will recognize the honorees formally at the convocation of its 103rd annual conference, in New York, Feb. 11. The 2015 annual conference-presenting scholarly sessions, panel discussions, career-development workshops, a book and trade fair and more-is the largest gathering of artists, scholars, students and arts professionals in the U.S. Lynn Boland, the museum's Pierre Daura Curator of European Art, who organized the exhibition and served as…

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Carissa DiCindio, curator of education at the Georgia Museum of Art, teaches a service-learning course called

Curator Takes Teaching Beyond the Classroom

Lecturing students is a common practice for a university professor to do in a classroom.  However, Carissa DiCindio, curator of education at the Georgia Museum of Art, rejects the practice of lecturing-and the traditional classroom setting. DiCindio, who teaches a unique special topics and service-learning course called "Engaging Art Museum Audiences as Student Docents," believes that in order for her students to truly gain a comprehensive understanding of the subject, they need to experience the process of museum tours firsthand. Students begin the course by shadowing a museum tour, reflecting on how the leading docent engages the audience and facilitates discussion around the artwork. This observation period is followed by students taking…

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GMOA Staff on Double-Duty

  For Paul Manoguerra, the classroom in which he teaches his special topics art history course is a brief stroll down the hall from his office, located on the third floor of the Georgia Museum of Art (GMOA). Manoguerra works both as chief curator and curator of American art at GMOA and as a professor at the University of Georgia. He is well acquainted with both art history and teaching. “I was a Ph.D student at Michigan State University in American studies, and my concentrations were in American art history, U.S. history and museum studies while I was there,” he says. While earning his doctorate, he taught classes at Michigan State University, Lansing Community College, Kalamazoo College and Western Michigan University. Course…

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Mark Zemlan of Surface Optics assists with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of the Orpheus Relief fragment at the Georgia Museum of Art.

Object in Focus: The Orpheus Relief Project

When initially considering Roman statues and bas-reliefs, one usually tends to visualize them as spotless sculptures of pure marble, adorned with details such as ivy, robes or a vase. In actuality, however, both Greek and Roman classical sculptures were frequently painted in bright colors. One relief in the collection of the University of Mississippi Museum that demonstrates this polychrome quality will be coming to visit the Georgia Museum of Art for a semester. An analysis of the relief shows traces of pigment from when the statue was originally created and painted, to heighten its sense of naturalism. The relief is a fragment of a much larger scene, and because it is a Roman copy of the Greek original (currently in the Louvre in Paris), researchers…

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